multiple genres TEKS talk image

Knowledge and Skills Statement

Multiple genres: listening, speaking, reading, writing, and thinking using multiple texts--genres. The student recognizes and analyzes genre-specific characteristics, structures, and purposes within and across increasingly complex traditional, contemporary, classical, and diverse texts.

Observe student responses while reading a text in a whole-group or small-group context, using a rubric. Students should be able to identify the central idea and provide at least four pieces of supporting evidence with the prompting of a teacher. The teacher can prompt student thinking by asking questions.

Examples:

  • What is the most important thing that happened in the text?
  • Can you name three details that tell you what the most important thing was?
  • What evidence led you to determining the central idea of the text?

Sample rubric:

  1. The student is unable to identify the central idea or provide supporting evidence even with adult assistance.
  2. The student is able to identify the central idea but is unable to provide supporting evidence even with adult assistance.
  3. The student is able to identify the central idea and is inconsistently able to provide supporting evidence with adult assistance.
  4. The student is able to identify the central idea and is able to provide supporting evidence with adult assistance.
The central idea is the main topic of an informational text. The central idea can be clearly stated in the text or require that students infer or read between the lines. Authors may introduce hints such as facts, details, or examples about the topic before stating the central idea.
Informational texts are texts that present information in order to explain, clarify, and/or educate. In second grade, they could include procedural text, magazines, newspapers, menus, nonfiction books, pamphlets, textbooks. Informational text characteristics include text and graphic features such as a table of contents, captions, bold print, glossaries, diagrams, etc. Informational text structures include compare/contrast, central idea with supporting facts, description, and cause and effect.
the available body of supporting, valid, and relevant details, facts, or information that supports an inference, idea, or proposition
a text that presents information in order to explain, clarify, and/or educate

Related 2009 Student Expectation

This student expectation is related to the following SE from the 2009 reading/language arts TEKS.

(14)  Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Expository Text. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about and understand expository text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to: 
(A)  identify the main idea in a text and distinguish it from the topic;